40 must see historical photographs that will make time travel possible

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To read something is very well but there is simply nothing like seeing with your own eyes. This 40 must see historical pictures will make you travel back in time and there are many things to like and many things to fear. You shall see industry and bravery but you shall also see racism and bigotry. There are many who would rewrite history  but there is no rewriting these perfectly digitzed -and mostly black and white- photographs taken by people who did it in the hope that someone like you would ever have a chance to see them.


Via Ranker

One of the sexiest women of the 1990s…

President Bill Clinton playing the Saxophone

Via Internet Archives

Bill Clinton was the US President in 199 when this picture was taken in Russia. The Russian President, Boris Yeltsin presented him with a saxophone and he seems quite a saxon player in this picture.

Farrah’s hair

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Farrah Fawcett had wonderful hair. Her hair style bacame so influential that suddenly every woman wore the hair like Farrah in the 1980s.

President George Bush in the Persian Gulf

Via Internet Archives

President George Bush in the company of US troops stationed in the Persian Gulf is seen in Thanksgiving day, enjoying dinner.

The Challenger in orbit

Via Internet Archives

The Space Shuttle “Challenger” in 1983.

President Ronald Reagan

Via Internet Archives

This spectacular picture of President Ronald Reagan was not taken as a poster in a studio. It was actually taken during a speech he was giving at a rally, in 1982, for Senator Durenberger. It certainly proves there are obvious advantages of being a professional actor, in politics.

The Commodore 64

 

Via boingboing

The Commodore 64 is arguably the most successful computer of all time. It sold over 17 million units since its launch in 1982 and like this ad says… It cost less than half the price of its rivals.

Boys in Brooklyn

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There were parts in New York City, in the 1970s that were entirely different from the rest of America at the time. Basically, Lynch Park and its surroundings, where this image was taken in 1974, was mostly populated by what we now call, African Americans, Hispanics and Caucassians with little resources.

 

Racing in the 70s

Internet Archives

Albuquerque, New Mexico, had three “stock car” race tracks. This image, was taken in Speedway Park -one of those three- in May 1972.

Brigitte Bardot in a London pub

 

Via Pinterest

A rare photograph of the renowned French actress and “sex-symbol” Brigitte Bardot to a pub in London.

Mexican-American in the 70s

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This teenager is a Mexican-American at the second ward in El Paso, Texas, 1972. Back then, it was a classic “barrio.”

The Fuel crisis

Via Internet Archives

The oil crisis began in 1973, during the winter. We can see the word “crissis” was not used lightly since fuel stations, such as this one, in Potlach, Washington, was turn into something else, namely an evangelical meeting hall. The pumps no longer provide regular and premium, but the Holy Ghost and Salvation.

Picking up Vietnamese refugees

Via Internet Archives

Many died in the Vietnam War, specially Vietnamese people. That is why this picture is significant. It shows Vietnamese refugees getting rescued by the USS Durham, a cargo ship, in the South China Sea, 1975.

Nixon leaving the Whitehouse

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One of the most notorius US Presidents to date, Richard Nixon is leaving the White House. Gerald Ford, who is going to be his successor, has not been sworn in yet. Washington D.C., 1974.

Planet Earth, from space in 1968

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This image of Earth was taken by astrnauts of the Apollo VIII mission, as they emerged from the dark side of the moon, in 1968.

One small step for men

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One of the most notable =and perhaps also controversial= images taken during the moon explorations. We can see the astronaut’s led and his foot as it leaves a footprint on lunar soil during the Apollo 11 mission. The astronaut’s name is -of course- Neil Armstrong and this picture was taken by himself with a 70mm lunar surface camera.

Martin Luther King & President Lyndon Johnson

Via Internet Archives

 

Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. and  President Lyndon. Both, seem unhappy and concerned, in 1966.

 

Love, not war

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This was one of many anti=Vietnam demonstrations. The lady is offering a flower to a military police officer who is on guard, at the Pentagon in Arlington, Virginia. 1962.

Happy Birthday

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The grandson of Dwight Eisenhower, President of the United States, is about to blow the candles of his cake during his birthday, flanked on both sides by Roy Rogers, a famous movie star and Dale Evans, a TV celebrity, in March, 1936.

Civil rights movement

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A rather young demonstrator during a demonstration for the Civil Rights movement.

Atomic Shelter

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Bomb Shelters in case of a nuclear strike were all the rage in the 1960s. The shelter pictured above was built by a man called Louis Severance and it was located right besides his home in Akron, Michigan. It had -among other things- a 10-inch reinforced concrete ceiling that was covered with thick earth. It cost him a total of $1,000 which would be somwhere about $7.978 in 2008 adjusting for inflation.

 

 

Desert Rock

Via Internet Archives

The idea of a nuclear war was, in the 1950s, perfectly feasible. Nobody back then believed it would result in an Appocalipse. This picture was taken 1951 during an excercise called “Desert Rock” and these troops were supposed to prepare to the idea of a nuclear blast and keeping their wits about them.

John F. Kennedy and his son

Via Internet Archives

President John F. Kennedy was photographed with his son, John Jr. in Rhode Island, 1964.

Tattooed Sailor

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This 1944 photograph of a sailor with tattoes was taken aboard the USS New Jersey in 1944, during WWII. Back then, it was pretty much sailors the only ones who wore them. Who would have thought back then that a few years in the future tattoes would be worn by -arguably- most people?

Japanese residents evacuated after Pearl Harbor

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Many Japanese were evacuated from San Francisco in 1942 after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. Some, had never actually been in Japan, having been brought to the US when they were little.

Working hard for the money

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This young lady from Texas was photographed the day after she travelled 35 miles back and forth, to pick peas along with her husband, to California in 1940. Both, worked 5 hrs each and made a total of TWO DOLLARS AND 25 cents. Inflation adjusted it would be about $41 (give o take).

Binge listening

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We now “binge” watch shows but back in 1930, the closest thing was to sit for hours in the living room to listen to the radio. Curiously enough, the TV had already been invented and by 1929 people who could afford them in the UK watched it. It would be several years before farmers such as this would learn about the existance of the device -let alone be able to afford one.

Getting money at the bank

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Going to the bank was in 1929 was very different to what we’re now used to in 2018.

Pumping it

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In this image that seems taken out of the film “Metropolis” a mechanic is working on a steam pump, in 1920.

Working in a Mill

Via Internet Archives

Further back in time, these workers have a job to perform at a mill, in Pittsburgh, 1909.

 

Child labor, when it was not really frowned upon

Via Internet Archives

This image taken in 1908 shows ten children in Newton, NC.

Working little girl

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This little girl’s name was Rose Blodo. She was 10 years old in 1910 when this picture was taken. She had been working for three summers. At the moment this pic was taken she was minding a baby and carrying berries. School had started four weeks ago but she would not be able to attend -for work reasons= for two more weeks.

Middle-aged man working on the Empire State Build

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This middle-aged man does not seem to feel the rigors of his age and keeps up with much younger men, woeking in the structure of the Empire State building, in 1930.

New York City..

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This image of New York city was actually taken in 1890 and it’s one of the oldest surviving photographs of the big apple. There doesn’t seem to be a car anywhere. All the vehicles are “horse-driven.”